New Book on Chilean Biosphere Reserves as “Sustainability Laboratories”

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After several years of research and preparation, Drs. Andrés Moreira (P. Univ. Católica, Chile) and Axel Borsdorf (Univ. of Innsbruck, Austria) have published an edited volume, entitled Chilean Biosphere Reserves – Laboratories for Sustainability, which includes conceptual and practical analyses of how to compatibilize human well-being and environmental conservation and provides descriptive case studies for the 10 biosphere reserves found in Chile. Dr. Christopher Anderson was invited to contribute the chapter on Cape Horn.

Two of the World’s Iconic Landscapes Together in One New Project for Research and Sustainability

2013-01-18 18.42.42So, what do the Grand Canyon and Patagonia have in common? Well, they are both places whose names evoke iconic imagery of some of the world’s most amazing landscapes. Now, they are also the sites of a binational project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation entitled Patagonia Research Experiences for Students in Sustainability (PRESS):  Understanding Social-Ecological Drivers & Consequences of Global Change.

This project will fund up to 8 students per year from Northern Arizona University to conduct research with mentors based at the Austral Center for Scientific Research, the Argentine National Parks Association, the National University of Southern Patagonia and the National University of Tierra del Fuego to study i) climate and land use change, ii) invasive species and iii) tourism/development in protected areas. For more information see: http://nau.edu/CIE/Global-Science-Engineering/Destinations/PRESS/. OSARA is proud to coordinate this new US-Patagonia link.

OSARA Facilitates First Patagonia Graduate Course on “Socio-Ecology”

DSC_0713Between 9-14 December 2013, 19 student participants came together in the Austral Center for Scientific Research (CADIC) to participate in a course organized by the National University of Tierra del Fuego in conjunction with the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech. The course, entitled “Integrating Human and Natural Dimensions to better Study and Conserve Socio–Ecological Systems,” brought together professors from the U.S. and Argentina and students from Argentina, Chile, U.S. and Columbia to explore what and how to incorporate humans not only into our studies of the world, but also the very way we conceive nature and the “human-nature” relationship.

OSARA Sponsors Socio-Ecology Symposium at 5th Chile-Argentina Binational Ecology Meeting

IMG_0317Socio-ecology: advancing towards the integration of the “human dimension” in the study and understanding of ecosystems in southern South America. 5th Binational Ecology Meeting, Puerto Varas, Chile. Salón Osorno, Hotel Patagónico, 8:30-11:30, 5 November 2013

The objective of this panel was to analyze how the study and management of socio-ecological topics can generate a greater understanding and favor the search for solutions at the local/regional level. Through presentations, discussions and associated posters, this symposium seeks to achieve a revision and analysis of the conceptual and methodological advances that are necessary to achieve a true and effective integration between natural and social sciences and the humanities. From this symposium, we hope to generate proposals that contribute to the projection of socio-ecology in Chile and Argentina as well as a Latin American and global scale. A manuscript for the Debates section of Ecologia Austral is currently in preparation by the symposium participants.

Research Center Expands in Tierra del Fuego

Wampliacion cadicith more than 30 years of history, the Austral Center for Scientific Research (CADIC for its initials in Spanish) is the major research center in the Tierra del Fuego Archipelago and indeed for southern Patagonia’s sub-Antarctic ecoregion. Hosting more than 100 scientists, technicians, students and support staff, CADIC works in a diverse array of areas, ranging from forestry, geology, archaeology, international relations, outreach, ecology and horticulture. Now, with an investment of nearly $2 million USD, the research institute has nearly doubled its space. The inaugural ceremony was presided over by President Cristina Fernandez by videoconference and the physical presence of Provincial Governor Fabiana Rios, demonstrating the highest political support for research in Tierra del Fuego, but also was attended by local scientists and citizens of Tierra del Fuego. For more information: CONICET website.

National Invasive Species Strategy

APNThe Argentine National Parks Service organized a workshop from 2-4 May in Calafate, Santa Cruz Province to advance a national strategy for invasive species. Organizers from the National Conservation Office lead participants from throughout the country’s regional scientific offices in progressing the formation of a national agenda that will complement similar efforts being advanced by the National Secretary of Environment and Sustainable Development. The event permitted authorities from diverse parts of Argentina to come together and recognize common threats and plan methodologies that will allow them to more effectively deal with the problem of introduced and invasive flora and fauna.

Tierra del Fuego Promoting Integrated Education

UNTDFThe recently launched National University of Tierra del Fuego has taken on several major challenges.  Not only is it the world’s southernmost institution of higher learning, but it has also taken on the challenge of meeting modern societies needs and placing its universities at the forefront of leading the development of the territory. One way this is being accomplished is by having all incoming students attend a course entitled “Introduction to the Study of Society, Culture and Environment”. UNTDF also is constituted by 4 interdisciplinary institutes, rather than the traditional “faculty” system made up of established fields of study within specific domains. In this way, the university is working to not only break rigid academic structures but also make sure that its work is relevant for social and environmental realities of Tierra del Fuego.

 

 

Enhancing the Link between Science and Society

100_0259Increasingly science funding agencies around the world are recognizing the need to link academic research and private and public sectors. Chile’s national science and technology commission (CONICYT) recently created a program to encourage precisely that type of linkage. One of the selected projects was presented by Dr. Silvia Murcia and Ernesto Davis, previously the beneficiary of an OSARA scholarship to conduct his masters. Their proposal, entitled Scientific-Technological Transfer for the Training of the Tourism Sector in the Magallanes and Chilean Antarctic Region, includes the participation of COMAPA, one of the major tourism companies in southern Patagonia. Over the course of a year, this co-financing of CONICYT and COMAPA will allow a systematic training regime to be implemented for the company’s guides. However, a novel aspect of the program will be not merely to teach the guides scientifically-related topics, but also to train them to become monitors within the national parks they visit to collect important (and hard to access) data and also as a “real-time” feedback mechanism for the company itself to evaluate and improve its practices, such as environmental impact but also the development of new narratives and content for the offerings provided to tourists. OSARA’s role in the project will be to advise the development of monitoring criteria and protocols and training for guides in the area of sustainable development and conservation.

Canadian Researchers Initiate Collaboration in TDF

cherieA group of five eco-hydrologists and riparian restoration specialists, led by Dr. Cherie Westbrook at the University of Saskathchewan, visited Tierra del Fuego from mid-February to mid-March to initiate a collaboration with the Austral Center for Scientific Research, the National University of Tierra del Fuego and the Argentine Administration of National Parks. Their team based their work in Tierra del Fuego National Park and started a long-term study of the effects of beavers on the hydrology and geomorphology of Tierra del Fuego’s watersheds. Ultimately, these results will be crucial to understand how and if riparian ecosystems can be restored upon beaver removal. An associated project, led by Dr. Colin Whitfield, studied the effects of beavers on carbon dynamics, specifically emission of methane. These results too will prove crucial in filling gaps in our current knowledge and understanding about the impacts of beaver invasion in southern Patagonia, particularly as they relate to carbon storage and sequestration.

Tierra del Fuego Set to Conform Network with “Archipelagic” Universities

UNTDFAs part of the Argentine Ministry of Education’s efforts to increase networking capacity of its universities, the National University of Tierra del Fuego (UNTDF) recently was awarded a project to lead the conformation of a network of “archipelagic” universities that include the University of the West Indies with various campuses throughout the Caribbean and the Universidad de La Laguna in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. The proposal includes plans to work over the coming year to define the areas between these universities where collaborative projects can be developed in the areas of student exchange, territorial development, and environmental management/conservation with a specific emphasis on how each of these axes interface with the particular condition of being found in an archipelagic setting.

Birder’s Exchange Supports Avian Research in Tierra del Fuego

In January, the Program Director o2012-12-28 08.21.46Birder’s Exchange (BEx) Betty Petersen visited southern Patagonia on a trip organized by Mass Audubon. During that trip, she provided a BEx donation of binoculars and reference books on bird banding to support the long-term ornithological research coordinated by Tierra del Fuego National Park and the Austral Center for Scientific Research (CADIC). OSARA is proud to help facilitate the relationship between the American Birding Associations BEx Program and conservation and research agencies in southern Patagonia. This important contribution will help not only researchers and park rangers conduct their work, but also provide opportunities for tourism operators and lay people to be involved in the projects taking place in Tierra del Fuego.

Citizen Science in El Chalten

At the northern tip of Glaciers National Park in Argentine Patagonia, the small town of El Chalten is situated in an amazing and iconic landscape. However, in spite of being flanked by the Fitzroy Mountains and just over these incredible Andean peaks the icy expanse of the Southern Icefields, El Chalten is not removed from global ecological programs. In the past few years, residents and park rangers have reported sightings of the introduced invasive species – the American mink (Neovison vison).

 

For this reason, the Argentine National Parks Administration’s Southern Patagonia Coordination Office has initiated a citizen science monitoring program to involve the local community in the detection of this species, to help managers determine quick and appropriate action. Managers, park rangers and scientists have created an education and involvement campaign that will last until February to create greater consciousness of the issue and also establish formal mechanisms for citizens to report their findings.

Chilean-Argentine Collaboration via Internships

Gabriel ZegersIn the spirit of crossing boundaries (geographic, political and academic), the ECO-Link project being developed in Tierra del Fuego with the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation has sought to bring together collaborators from Chile, Argentina and the U.S. to study the social and ecological dimensions of invasive species management and ecosystem restoration. These team members include government agencies, such as the Argentine National Parks Service and the Chilean Agriculture and Livestock Service, but also academic programs, such as Virginia Tech University and the National University of Tierra del Fuego. Beginning in December 2012, this group has expanded to include a nascient collaboration with the Catholic University in Santiago. From mid-December to mid-January, Gabriel Zegers (student of Agronomy with a mention in Environmental Management) conducted an internship at the Austral Center for Scientific Research in Ushuaia. Under the aegis of ECO-Link, Gabriel carried out a preliminary analysis of the political and institutional dimensions of Chilean incentives, laws and regulations surrounding invasive species and ecosystem conservation.

Long-Term Bird Research in Tierra del Fuego

For the past 3 years, researchers at the Austral Center for Scientific Research have led an initiative to establish long-term avian research in Tierra del Fuego Island. With the support of Birder’s Exchange, these scientists are working with the staff of Tierra del Fuego National Park and local tourism operators to link the ecological research with other social actors and bring greater awareness and involvement of the citizens of Ushuaia to the forest birds that surround the world’s southernmost city. To date, this project has helped to establish seasonal patterns of forest avifauna and also determined specific vegetation and habitat conditions required for particular species. The goal of this program is not only to involved different social actors in the research being conducted in the national park, but also bring tools that decision makers can use in the future to improve the design of protected areas, specifically bringing a landscape level focus to the study of biota and habitat in southern Patagonia.